Asian School Reviews

Search ESLwatch

Log in Register

Log in

Your trust is our top priority, institutes are not allowed to alter or remove their reviews.

Institute reviews can be submitted anonymously by employees, students, parents or even if you have had an interview. Read employee reviews and ratings on ESLwatch to decide if an institute is right for you.

 

"Lead by example and inspire with your review"

Did you know that 9/10 people will search for reviews in their own research, but will not take five minutes to help others by reviewing their own institute.

Korea, South in Asia (school): International English School - International School - South KoreaInternational English School is an international school located in Wonju, South Korea.

 

Address: Musil-ro 181, Wonju-si, Gangwon-do, 220-040, South Korea.

Website: International English School

 

 

 

 

Pin It
4.8/5 from 23 ratings.
  • Experience
  • Professionalism
  • Work location
  • Living situation
  • Pay & benefits
  • Support & facilities
  • Health & safety
Summary rating
Reviewer
1 rating(s).
45 helpful voted.
The Best School in South Korea for Students and Teachers
1 months ago.
Experience
Professionalism
Work location
Living situation
Pay & benefits
Support & facilities
Health & safety
Institute Review
International English School in Wonju was created and carefully designed to give each of our students the best possible English so they can achieve their goals in life – whatever they may be. Education always comes first at our school. I’m Songae Chweh, principal and owner of the school.

Our students are nearly always the highest in their class no matter which school they attend, with students commuting from as far away as Seoul and Incheon.

We have a beautiful, clean, modern school and excellent housing for our teachers. Check this link for photos: https://englishschool.livejournal.com/photo/

Our classes have a m*x*mum of 5 students and are closely grouped by level and speed of learning. We teach speaking, listening, reading and writing in our regular classes and add math, science and social studies when the students are ready. All of our classes are in English only and we only hire native English speakers. We also offer special classes in speech & communications and writing, for higher level students. We have a mini-theater for acting in our speech room and a small stage for assemblies, speeches and acting in our auditorium.

Our students are all interviewed and placed in classes according to their English ability level. We only accept well-behaved students who actually want to learn, and only accept parents who are serious about their children’s learning and who will support the teachers and the school in matters of discipline and homework.

All students are treated equally at all times - this is a one of our first principles that our teachers learn during training – and we have a variety of systems to ensure equal treatment. No mention is ever made about a student’s financial situation or family income and we never reveal to our teachers the names of any of our scholarship students from needy families. Every student is given the best possible English education without exception.

Our students are nearly always, polite, gentle, sweet and hardworking. Discipline problems almost never come up, but in the case of any student who disrupts classes, speaks Korean in class or doesn’t study, we have a series of warnings followed by expulsion when necessary. Given our pre-screening, our students are nearly always the best behaved you could ask for. We have never had, nor would we tolerate, any student exhibiting violent behavior or bullying toward other students at our school.

We have all of our reading books on tape with 7 listening rooms for the students to practice in, and maintain a supply of copies so students don’t have to buy books. We have made a huge investment in our library with thousands of books for the students’ outside reading and 5 video rooms, now with over 14,000 movies and TV episodes organized by level and age – all provided free and which we encourage students to use outside of class, any day of the week.

We are proud of our graduates who have matriculated to top English language universities all over the world using English language skills they acquired entirely at our school. Although scholarships for international students are rare, nearly all of our students have received academic scholarships at their US universities – many over $100,000.

For teachers we offer the best possible experience during their stay in South Korea and we offer a pay package that we believe is one of the best in Korea for ESL teachers outside of some universities. Our cash pay is always slightly higher than other schools; we pay round-trip airfare (not just one-way) and have either a 2 or 3 bedroom condo provided free for each teacher. Our teacher housing is better than the average family housing in Wonju and within a 10 minute walk to our school. Photos: https://englishschool.livejournal.com/photo/

We have free meals in our kitchen each day, two vacation breaks of 9 days or more including weekends and all the national holidays. We have full pension and national health care from the first week – as soon as the teacher can get his or her ARC (which is legally required in 10 days not 90). Teachers also receive a severance payment of one month’s pay for each year worked, pro-rated after 12 months, with the calculation based on their final highest month’s salary level. We withhold income taxes at the correct rate – usually below 2%, although our higher paid teachers do pay more on Korea’s progressive income tax.

At renewal time, for our outstanding teachers, we offer raises, and a bonus every six months in lieu of airfare, since they already received their airfare to and from Korea for their first year. Any teacher who is already in Korea or not leaving Korea receives a cash payment equal to their un-needed airfare as bonuses in their first year as well.

Our teacher housing is professionally cleaned before the teacher moves in. Furnishings provided by the school are complete enough that a teacher will not need to buy anything but food and pay utilities during their stay, and include: a full-size bed, clothes dresser or armoire, air conditioner, washing machine, drying rack, full-size gas range and oven, refrigerator, microwave oven, kitchen table and two chairs, desk and chair, sofa or love seat, color TV, TV table or stand, basic kitchen pots, pans, dishes and utensils, rice cooker, toaster, vacuum cleaner, iron and board, night stand, landline telephone.

Our teachers receive itemized pay sheets each month with every won itemized. The teacher brings their bills to the school and the school pays them and itemizes their pay sheets. No teacher has ever paid their own bills, nor has any teacher wanted to do so. Teachers are encouraged to keep records of their bills, and all bills including the health insurance and pension bills from the Korean government are available for the teacher to check at any time. And, again, all bills are itemized on the teachers’ pay sheets.

I have personally taken every teacher to get their medical exams and to Immigration to get their ARCs – both of which are paid for by the school. When teachers are sick, I take them to the doctor – and I insist they go even for what might seem to be minor conditions.

When a teacher is too ill to teach, we cover for them or reschedule classes as necessary to give them time to recover. On one occasion a teacher was chewing gum in class - (the only time this ever happened at our school as it is against the rules for students to have candy or gum in class) – so we reminded the teacher it was impolite to chew gum in front of the students. She then informed me that she was ill, which was not apparent and she had not mentioned it before, so I sent her home to rest and insisted on taking her to the doctor the next day.

We have always had a waiting list for admission to our school – some on the pre-interview list and some on the post-interview list. Because of our small class sizes and with students tightly grouped by ability levels, there is very often no spot where a student will fit, so waiting is unfortunately unavoidable.

We have basic levels of Beginner 1,2,3, Intermediate 1,2,3, Advanced 1,2,3, and SAT 1,2,3, however each of these is broken into 4 internal levels with a distinct difference in the abilities of the students at each level. With so many levels it is often impossible to immediately find an open spot where a student will fit based on ability and time. In addition, except those returning from 2 or more years immersed in an English speaking country, we have never found any student from any other school or hogwan whose level was higher than our beginner levels. As a result, our higher level classes can only be filled with our own students as they advance through our program.

We will not add students to open spots just to fill them. Students studying below their actual level will be bored and disrupt the class. Students studying above their actual level will be frustrated, unable to handle the material and disrupt the class.

Education always comes first.

Many of our teachers stay for 3 years or longer, and on the average, our teachers stay more than 2 years. We are very proud of our former teachers who have gone on to medical degrees, law degrees and master’s degrees in various fields and we are always happy to give them glowing recommendations for their future endeavors for their outstanding teaching to our outstanding students.

Other teachers come to Korea on a gap year – many of the best and brightest, in fact – intending to earn money before going on to their various graduate programs.

Two other categories of teachers also come to Korea. Some teachers are barely adequate, although they may be able to complete a 1 year contract by restricting them to easy beginner classes. The other category comprises teachers who are unable to read, spell, teach or grade papers of 13 simple spelling words or even the ABCs - even with a key!

Yes, these are individuals with college degrees and some with experience of teaching one or more years at schools where no one notices.

At our school, we notice. Unfit teachers are asked to leave within the first month or two. They are not trainable and would hurt any student they were allowed to teach. We have no choice. Yes, some teachers have left our school within three months – they were fired due to gross incompetence.

At International English School, we have the best teachers, the best pay package and the best students. We give them the best English.

Our school operates very much like a non-profit. The school began and has remained debt-free, everyone is on salary – including me – and any surplus after paying all salaries and bills is used for long-term improvements to teacher housing, the school facilities and new materials for the students.

At International English School, education always comes first.
The pros
Students get the best possible English to achieve their life goals, score at the top of their elementary, middle and high schools in English, matriculate to top universities and earn scholarships at some of the best universities in the world.

Teachers teach small, classes of eager students, earn better than average salaries, with the best housing and benefits.
The cons
For students who don't study or misbehave will be expelled. Of course this is a positive for everyone else.

For teachers who are incompetent, you will be fired. This too is a positive for everyone else.
Institution Location
Mushilro 181, Wonju, Kanwondo, South Korea 26447
Relationship
2003 - present
Show more
45 of 48 people found the following review helpful
Reviewer
1 rating(s).
7 helpful voted.
Absolute disgrace of a school - famous for the number of teachers who quit - watch out!
2 months ago.
Experience
Professionalism
Work location
Living situation
Pay & benefits
Support & facilities
Health & safety
Institute Review
Wonju is a lovely small town and the students at the school are so sweet, so clever, and so kind. When the head teacher would come in and shout nonsense at me they would always try to comfort me afterwards and tell me not to worry about what that "angry Grandpa" says. Of course I didn't want them to think they needed to comfort me or see any of that play out especially because it was wasting the time they paid money to be learning during, but it was still sweet to see kids be so innocent and kind in such a situation.

The school and the apartments for teachers are so dirty. You will find huge gray and black dust clumps everywhere as well as doors and walls tinted grey from never being cleaned. When I was there I gave everything a few times over with a clorox wipe and it lifted a significant amount of the grey tinge.

The school is all about making money and using cheap sales tactics, the actual quality of education there is so low its pretty much nonexistent. You could always tell which kids came from which schools because their English level was directly related to the school they went to in the daytime, not anything done at the Hagwon. For just one example of the cheap sales tactics they relied on over actual results and quality, T=they tried their best to shout at us teachers and berates us until we would tell our students "this is the only place in the whole world you can really learn English if you don't come here you will never be able to learn it and if you don't learn English you will never succeed at anything in life." This is some nonsense the head teacher would drone on about on repeat. I think he may actually believe it himself but its so ridiculous I can't fully accept that as the case. Even the youngest kids never fell for it, they would always make fun of him behind his back for his less than logical rants among many other things. At least they were learning English when they would try to mock him for what he said lol.

They had us treat the kids differently depending on how rich the families are and how many potential referrals can come from the parents. I had one young boy who loved to bully his classmates, but his mother was apparently very well connected and the family rich, so I was shouted at to never say no to him or discipline him in any way, but if any of the kids he was poking or punching or slapping would do it to him back they would have to stand at the wall with their arms above their head in timeout. Obviously the kids saw the pattern right away (anything "so unfair" is definitely something kids that age will catch on to right away) so between the bullying and the lack of respect the kids had for the system the learning environment was constantly disrupted. How was I told to deal with this? I believe the exact words were "Just yell at them until you make them cry. Don't stop until you see tears. This is the only way to break them into our system." Literally "break them into our system" like this is a prison camp or a breeding facility for animals.

The materials they use are photocopies of an old book that was covered in whiteout blotches and extra words written in unsophisticatedly. A lot of what they teach is incorrect or heinously outdated (IE "u*d*e*" "boxers" and "underwear" are all incorrect the students, both boys and girls, can ONLY call them "p*n*i*s" and "beatbox" isn't a real word it "almost was in the 80s but nobody has said it ever since and if you use it in the US people will stare at you like you're an idiot because it's not a good word they don't know what it means") reflective of how old and out of touch the head teacher is. The other teachers and I would always chat in comedic horror about the day one of the boys grows up, goes abroad, and says anything about his "p*n*i*s" to his friends.

They also demanded I work when I had food poisoning (and active double-end excretion); the principal just said something along the lines of "go to the bathroom when you need to, then just go back to the classroom. You don't even have to say anything, you just have to be there at least once per class so we don't have to cancel the classes." (but in broken English because ironically the principal's English was awful) Then I got in trouble for chewing gum, despite it being an attempt to spare my students of my v*m*t breath and general disgusting odors as much as possible, and despite the fact that I was there with back to back rounds of v*m*ting and diarrhea and they were so unappreciative they were literally shouting at me about walking out of the bathroom with gum in my mouth as if it were any other day and I were just chewing gum for the fun of it. It also really creeped me out the way the principal dealt with my food poisoning in terms of trying to stop me from talking to any doctors etc and just being super controlling about it. Kind of like the way they didn't let us open or pay our own bills - the principal was adamant we just hand them over and let them deduct it from our pay without checking LOL wonder why. The first time I got a bill I just went and paid it myself, as they never said anything about it to me (there was no orientation btw they just let you sit in on classes of the teacher you're replacing and ask you to duplicate what they did) and I just assumed I'm an adult I have a job I pay my bills. The principal shouted at me about it in broken English insisting "ANY MAIL YOU GET, YOU BRING ME, ALL MAIL YOU GET, BRING ME!" on an endless loop for at least a few minutes (as if once isn't enough to understand that statement?), and I'm just in my head like "lol so if I get a birthday card from my dad bring that to you?" but obviously I could read the subtext that it was about bills and not birthday cards (unless the birthday card would have money in it, then I'm sure they'd want it haha) and I asked my coworker about it later and she filled me in fully.

I always got the impression that the head teacher really resented that my education level was higher than his and that I didn't pretend to fall for any of his nonsense. He was also weirdly compet*t*ve about gifts from students. He would only rarely get any, whereas the other teachers got them often. One day another teacher got a bunch of stickers from a student and she put them up on her board (as we do whenever we get such type of gifts). The next time he came into her room he got visibly upset when he saw them and started obsessing about them, asking her all sorts of questions about which students gave her gifts and how many did she usually get etc etc and then going on to waste her time talking on end about how she "wouldn't even believe all the gifts" he gets "from students" "too many to even display them all" etc etc. It was so pathetic in a weird compet*t*ve kind of way it was actually really sad. Then when she came back to her room after lunch she saw him in their trying to remove all the stickers from her board. He said it was "too cluttered" and he needed to. So deranged.

Honestly there's so much more I could say and some of it a lot worse but I feel like those small bits of info give a clear insight into how the school is. Overall, its a depressing, disturbing place, famous in Wonju for losing teachers within 1-3 months of their joining, and struggling to fill classes (despite claiming they have a long long waiting list). The teacher I replaced made it so much longer than most do because she was consistently promised a glowing character recommendation for a compet*t*ve post graduate program she really wanted to get into, but when the letter of recommendation finally came it was actually just boldly defamatory towards her. The worst part is she wanted to screen it first just to be safe (because the head teacher is such a loon she thought he might write something so silly the school wouldn't take it seriously) so the head teacher sent directly to her by email, knowingly, a long list of insults in the (very loose) form of a letter of recommendation. He is absolutely shameless and completely lacks class, integrity, and professionalism - not to mention connection to reality and emotional stability. The principal is so depressed, disempowered, and low self esteem which everyone thinks is the result of working with the temper-tantrum prone less than intelligent head teacher for so long. But she does it for the money (btw she seems to absolutely detest being around the kids and often b*o*s up at them spontaneously or just walks away from them to bang her head on her desk and talk to herself under her breath) while it seems the head teacher does it because its the only place in the world he could manage to create where he could indulge his own self-delusions. He would never in a million years be able to teach in the US (where he's from) and he certainly would never be able to work under anybody else without getting fired. One of my coworkers while I was there was convinced he had autism based on how he conducted himself but I really don't think so. Autism is not that dark.

The pros
Wonju is a lovely small town and the students at the school are so sweet, so clever, and so kind. When the head teacher would come in and shout nonsense at me they would always try to comfort me afterwards and tell me not to worry about what that "angry Grandpa" says. Of course I didn't want them to think they needed to comfort me or see any of that play out especially because it was wasting the time they paid money to be learning during, but it was still sweet to see kids be so innocent and kind in such a situation.
The cons
The school and the apartments for teachers are so dirty. You will find huge gray and black dust clumps everywhere as well as doors and walls tinted grey from never being cleaned. When I was there I gave everything a few times over with a clorox wipe and it lifted a significant amount of the grey tinge.

The school is all about making money and using cheap sales tactics, the actual quality of education there is so low its pretty much nonexistent. You could always tell which kids came from which schools because their English level was directly related to the school they went to in the daytime, not anything done at the Hagwon. For just one example of the cheap sales tactics they relied on over actual results and quality, T=they tried their best to shout at us teachers and berates us until we would tell our students "this is the only place in the whole world you can really learn English if you don't come here you will never be able to learn it and if you don't learn English you will never succeed at anything in life." This is some nonsense the head teacher would drone on about on repeat. I think he may actually believe it himself but its so ridiculous I can't fully accept that as the case. Even the youngest kids never fell for it, they would always make fun of him behind his back for his less than logical rants among many other things. At least they were learning English when they would try to mock him for what he said lol.

They had us treat the kids differently depending on how rich the families are and how many potential referrals can come from the parents. I had one young boy who loved to bully his classmates, but his mother was apparently very well connected and the family rich, so I was shouted at to never say no to him or discipline him in any way, but if any of the kids he was poking or punching or slapping would do it to him back they would have to stand at the wall with their arms above their head in timeout. Obviously the kids saw the pattern right away (anything "so unfair" is definitely something kids that age will catch on to right away) so between the bullying and the lack of respect the kids had for the system the learning environment was constantly disrupted. How was I told to deal with this? I believe the exact words were "Just yell at them until you make them cry. Don't stop until you see tears. This is the only way to break them into our system." Literally "break them into our system" like this is a prison camp or a breeding facility for animals.

The materials they use are photocopies of an old book that was covered in whiteout blotches and extra words written in unsophisticatedly. A lot of what they teach is incorrect or heinously outdated (IE "u*d*e*" "boxers" and "underwear" are all incorrect the students, both boys and girls, can ONLY call them "p*n*i*s" and "beatbox" isn't a real word it "almost was in the 80s but nobody has said it ever since and if you use it in the US people will stare at you like you're an idiot because it's not a good word they don't know what it means") reflective of how old and out of touch the head teacher is. The other teachers and I would always chat in comedic horror about the day one of the boys grows up, goes abroad, and says anything about his "p*n*i*s" to his friends.

They also demanded I work when I had food poisoning (and active double-end excretion); the principal just said something along the lines of "go to the bathroom when you need to, then just go back to the classroom. You don't even have to say anything, you just have to be there at least once per class so we don't have to cancel the classes." (but in broken English because ironically the principal's English was awful) Then I got in trouble for chewing gum, despite it being an attempt to spare my students of my v*m*t breath and general disgusting odors as much as possible, and despite the fact that I was there with back to back rounds of v*m*ting and diarrhea and they were so unappreciative they were literally shouting at me about walking out of the bathroom with gum in my mouth as if it were any other day and I were just chewing gum for the fun of it. It also really creeped me out the way the principal dealt with my food poisoning in terms of trying to stop me from talking to any doctors etc and just being super controlling about it. Kind of like the way they didn't let us open or pay our own bills - the principal was adamant we just hand them over and let them deduct it from our pay without checking LOL wonder why. The first time I got a bill I just went and paid it myself, as they never said anything about it to me (there was no orientation btw they just let you sit in on classes of the teacher you're replacing and ask you to duplicate what they did) and I just assumed I'm an adult I have a job I pay my bills. The principal shouted at me about it in broken English insisting "ANY MAIL YOU GET, YOU BRING ME, ALL MAIL YOU GET, BRING ME!" on an endless loop for at least a few minutes (as if once isn't enough to understand that statement?), and I'm just in my head like "lol so if I get a birthday card from my dad bring that to you?" but obviously I could read the subtext that it was about bills and not birthday cards (unless the birthday card would have money in it, then I'm sure they'd want it haha) and I asked my coworker about it later and she filled me in fully.

I always got the impression that the head teacher really resented that my education level was higher than his and that I didn't pretend to fall for any of his nonsense. He was also weirdly compet*t*ve about gifts from students. He would only rarely get any, whereas the other teachers got them often. One day another teacher got a bunch of stickers from a student and she put them up on her board (as we do whenever we get such type of gifts). The next time he came into her room he got visibly upset when he saw them and started obsessing about them, asking her all sorts of questions about which students gave her gifts and how many did she usually get etc etc and then going on to waste her time talking on end about how she "wouldn't even believe all the gifts" he gets "from students" "too many to even display them all" etc etc. It was so pathetic in a weird compet*t*ve kind of way it was actually really sad. Then when she came back to her room after lunch she saw him in their trying to remove all the stickers from her board. He said it was "too cluttered" and he needed to. So deranged.

Honestly there's so much more I could say and some of it a lot worse but I feel like those small bits of info give a clear insight into how the school is. Overall, its a depressing, disturbing place, famous in Wonju for losing teachers within 1-3 months of their joining, and struggling to fill classes (despite claiming they have a long long waiting list). The teacher I replaced made it so much longer than most do because she was consistently promised a glowing character recommendation for a compet*t*ve post graduate program she really wanted to get into, but when the letter of recommendation finally came it was actually just boldly defamatory towards her. The worst part is she wanted to screen it first just to be safe (because the head teacher is such a loon she thought he might write something so silly the school wouldn't take it seriously) so the head teacher sent directly to her by email, knowingly, a long list of insults in the (very loose) form of a letter of recommendation. He is absolutely shameless and completely lacks class, integrity, and professionalism - not to mention connection to reality and emotional stability. The principal is so depressed, disempowered, and low self esteem which everyone thinks is the result of working with the temper-tantrum prone less than intelligent head teacher for so long. But she does it for the money (btw she seems to absolutely detest being around the kids and often b*o*s up at them spontaneously or just walks away from them to bang her head on her desk and talk to herself under her breath) while it seems the head teacher does it because its the only place in the world he could manage to create where he could indulge his own self-delusions. He would never in a million years be able to teach in the US (where he's from) and he certainly would never be able to work under anybody else without getting fired. One of my coworkers while I was there was convinced he had autism based on how he conducted himself but I really don't think so. Autism is not that dark.

Institution Location
Wonju South Korea

Musil-ro 181, Wonju-si, Gangwon-do, 220-040, South Korea
Relationship
Former teacher.
Show more
7 of 40 people found the following review helpful
Reviewer
1 rating(s).
38 helpful voted.
My Best School!
1 years ago.
Experience
Professionalism
Work location
Living situation
Pay & benefits
Support & facilities
Health & safety
Institute Review
Hello. It looks like I'm the first one to write a review about this school. I'm a student who has been studying English (of course) at this school for 14 years. This school is a hogwan and among all the schools that I have attended, I'm sure that this school's the best school in my life. Although it is focused on teaching English, we also learn a lot of other things. They teach math, social science and science in English and it helped me understand the differences between Korean and U.S. subjects. The principal and teachers are all nice. I can see that they are all helping students study well and truly want them to be successful in their futures. Soon, I'll leave to go to a university in the U.S. It's really hard to be accepted to U.S. schools if you're a student who only went to a regular high school in Wonju and never lived in or visited English speaking countries. It would've not be possible if the principal and the head teacher of this school didn't help me. I'm really grateful for their assistance and care. I will never forget my time and experience at this school even after I fly off to the U.S.
P.S. I'm a student, however, I know that every teacher who works here stays in a condo which is really close to this school (it takes 5-10 minutes to walk from their condos to here). I have seen some of them and they looked nice and big for one person.
The pros
Nice teachers and a principal who really care about students.
Tons of books.
Many video rooms & computers loaded with tons of videos.
Nice environment to study.
Small class size (m*x*mum 5 students in one class), but not a small school.
The cons
There's no traffic light for a crosswalk in front of this school. (It's not this school's fault, though...)
Institution Location
This school is located at Musilro 181, Wonju, Kangwondo, South Korea.
Relationship
I'm a student who has been studying at this school for 14 years.
Show more
38 of 42 people found the following review helpful

Adding Your institution is Easy as 1-2-3

Simply add your institution, the form only takes a few minutes.

Register yourself on the website confirm that you are a human. Wait for confirmation via email.

Once you login to the website you can then review your chosen institution.

Recently Added

Huili School Hangzhou (Huili Education) is a private school located in Hangzhou, China. Address: Jingchao Road, Xiaoshan District, Hangzhou East...
Huili School Shanghai (Huili Education) is a private school located in Shanghai, China. Address: No. 235 Linyao Road, Pudong, Shanghai,...
Somapapattana School is a private school located in Bangkok, Thailand. Address: Prayasurat Road, - Soi Prayasuri 35, Bangchan, Khlong Samwa,...
CHINEASE is a recruiter located in Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom. address: 4th floor, Wynne Jones Building, Ellson Place, Newcastle...
English Language Aid (ELA) is an online website located in Brighton, United Kingdom. Address: Brighton, England. Website: English Language Aid (ELA)...
TEFLworld (TEFL world) The British International School of Samui is a private school located in Samui, Thailand. Address: Panyadee, The...
Mt Maria College Petrie is a catholic co-educational secondary college located in Petrie, Australia. Address: Armstrong Street, Petrie, QLD 4502...

Connect With Us Today

We believe it’s important to stay closely connected with the great individuals and organizations in the ESL/EFL industry, and what better way than through social media? We’re constantly posting updates online and participating in the buzz.

Please consider connecting with us on the following social media websites to stay up-to-date and connected!

 

Select a Country

Have you added your Institution!

Add your institution for review!

Thank for using ESLwatch, just one more thing before you go. Have you added your institution for review?

Does not matter if it is a school, college, university, recruiter, company, individual or online website that you have had dealings with in the past or present. The review form only takes a few minutes and you do not have to review the institution yourself.

 

Add Your Institution for Review

x